lords prayer words - traditional and contemporary prayers

The Lord's Prayer

The Lord's Prayer is one of the worlds best known and most spoken prayers. There are many versions of this prayer in existence - ranging from the 16th Century traditional one (from the Anglican Book of Common Prayer, 1662) to versions in more modern English. On this page is the "Our Father" as we read it in the King James Bible (in Matthew Chapter 6) together with links to commentaries that explore the meaning of this famous prayer:-

The Lord's Prayer
King James Version (KJV)


9 Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.

 10 Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

 11 Give us this day our daily bread.

 12 And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.

 13 And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen.


These are the words from the Lord's prayer in Matthew 6:9-13, taken from the King James Bible
(Authorized version of the scriptures, 1611)



Explore the Lord's Prayer through the writings of three famous biblical theologians (Matthew Henry, Adam Clarke and Albert Barnes).

The Lord's prayer opens with addressing God as "Father who art in Heaven". There are then seven petitions. The first requests are contected with the worship of God ("Hallowed be thy name") and His ways. The next four concern the needs of man - his physical ("Give us today our daily bread"), mental (with temptation) spiritual (against evil) and relational needs (forgiveness). The prayer then concludes with a doxology.


The Lord's Prayer

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The Lord's Prayer

The Lord's prayer contains the sum total of religion and morals.

(Wellington)


The Lord's Prayer

A short inspiring reading of this famous prayer:-


In this section of the website, the Lord's Prayer is explored through the writings of a number of well known biblical scholars and theologians, including John Welsey (the founding father of the modern day Methodist Church), Charles Spurgeon (famous 19th century English Baptist preacher) and John Calvin (16th century reformer and theologian). The study by John Wesley considers that the prayer may be broken down into three sections - it contains a preface ("Our Father"), petitions ("Give us this day" etc), and a conclusion (the doxology). Read more at our in-depth commentary on the Lord's Prayer.




Take a moment to hear from God...

here are links to some wonderfully inspired prayers to aid your journey